The Mystery Unveiled: GOP’s Defense on Trump’s ‘Poisoning the Blood’ Remark…

Latest articles

CPAC vs. South Carolina GOP Primary: What’s...

In the absence of a better phrase, it is a political watershed day that...

Can Haley Bridge the Divide? Democrats Showing...

To mitigate what looks like an inevitable crushing loss in the home state's primary,...

Trump’s Bold Move: Dismissal of Classified Documents...

By presenting a jumble of arguments, including that the charges are legally flawed, that...

Some Republicans have now come to Trump’s defence, proposing an alternate theory: Perhaps he was actually referring to the fentanyl problem. This comes amid the continuing repercussions from Trump’s remarks regarding immigrants, which have been compared to Adolf Hitler.

Some of Trump’s party members have reacted negatively to the comments, while others have rallied behind him.

The rate of fentanyl poisoning per capita in my state is higher than the national average. A group of online Alaska Native leaders and I had a conference call around three or four months ago. Sen. Dan Sullivan (R-Alaska) spoke with HEADLINESFOREVER on Wednesday, and he said that the first three questions that came up during the large conference call were regarding the southern border.

I agree if that was his point; I just didn’t grasp the full picture. Personally, I wouldn’t use such language. Is it true, nevertheless, that illegal immigrants are poisoning and murdering Americans at alarming rates? Especially in my home state, even though I’m located four thousand miles from the nearest border.

Similarly, Ohio Republican Sen. J.D. Vance sought to connect Trump’s remarks to the catastrophe that killed over 105,000 Americans last year.

To start, he never once said that immigration were a poison to American society. Vance reportedly told The Hill that illegal immigrants were “poisoning the blood of this country,” a statement that is “objectively and obviously true” when one considers the statistics surrounding fentanyl overdoses.

Trump stated at his Saturday event in New Hampshire that “we got a lot of work to do” because millions of immigrants had been “let” into the country.

“Our nation’s blood is being poisoned by them. “That’s exactly what they’ve done,” Trump declared.

Not limited to South America alone. Not only from the three or four nations that come to mind, but from all over the globe — Africa, Asia, you name it — people are flooding into our nation. A flood of people is entering our nation. Their presence is unnoticed. Their arrival is sudden. A huge crime will be committed. The terrorist attacks will be,” he continued. At a rally in Iowa on Tuesday, he reiterated his position.

The Democratic Party has compared his remarks to Hitler’s, and on Wednesday, the campaign of Vice President Joe Biden shared social media posts linking the language of Trump and Hitler.

While Trump rejected any connection to Hitler at the Iowa event, his campaign has yet to address the question of what he meant by “the blood of America being poisoned” by immigrants.

Representative Nicole Malliotakis (R-N.Y.) provided an explanation for the comments and offered her own take on them during a CNN interview on Monday.

His comment regarding the Democratic policy made me think of poisoning when he uttered it. Given the current immigration situation in New York City, Malliotakis speculated that he might have been referring to the open border policy.

“The amount of fentanyl that’s coming over the open border is actually poisoning America,” she warned.

Republican excuses follow a script that has been playing out since the party nominee’s 2016 presidential campaign: Trump says something offensive, which causes enormous outrage, and the Republicans have to figure out how to divert the blame or find a way to defend their candidate.

Even some of the president’s closest congressional friends expressed their frustration after the Jan. 6 assault on the Capitol, suggesting that the cycle had reached a peak. In the time after, however, the vast majority of Republicans have joined his effort to regain the presidency, and Trump maintains a commanding lead in national polls among Republican primary candidates.


More like this

CPAC vs. South Carolina GOP Primary: What’s Happening Today?

In the absence of a better phrase, it is a political watershed day that might provide the Republican Party the confirmation it needed over...

Can Haley Bridge the Divide? Democrats Showing Interest…

To mitigate what looks like an inevitable crushing loss in the home state's primary, Nikki Haley and her supporters are relying on Democrats. A small...

Trump’s Bold Move: Dismissal of Classified Documents Case…

By presenting a jumble of arguments, including that the charges are legally flawed, that prosecutors have targeted him for political reasons, and that the...